Listen to Kate Hudson’s ‘Cinema Italiano’ from ‘Nine’

Posted by · 10:26 am · November 27th, 2009

Kate Hudson in NineWednesday we featured the original song “Take It All” from Rob Marshall’s “Nine.” Today we’re happy to feature the other tune conceived by Maury Yeston specifically for the film: “Cinema Italiano,” performed by Kate Hudson.

Hudson’s Vogue journalist Stephanie was expanded considerably for the film, a lustful young thing who announces, “Style is the new substance.  It’s what my readers want.”  Her song kicks in during an attempt at seducing Daniel Day-Lewis’s crisis-stricken filmmaker Guido Contini and is meant to reflect the flashbulb-popping chic and panache of the entertainment industry, and certainly, Stephanie’s place in that shallow world.

I would say it stands out as the most catching tune of the piece, but it’s also the most out of place and has some fairly trite lyrics (and some odd rhythm shifts), but it’s a sure bet for a nod, along with the aforementioned “Take It All.”  Give it a listen below and tell us what you think.

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→ 24 Comments Tags: , , , , , | Filed in: Daily

24 responses so far

  • 1 11-27-2009 at 10:38 am

    Andrew R. said...

    Kate Hudson sings well (better than a lot of pop singers today), and i’ve listened to this a song lately (I got the 4 track CD) and it’s actually growing on me. Based on the footage i’ve seen it doesn’t stick out as much as I thought it would at first, and i’m very familiar with the stage show. I know a lot of people don’t feel that way though. It’s too bad the new Stephanie doesn’t do the Trouble With Contini rap like the small part of Stephanie Necrophuros in the play during Folies Bergeres, that’s a pretty cool part.

    Cinema Italiano definitely would be fun to watch be performed on Oscar night, but still would rather watch Marion.

  • 2 11-27-2009 at 10:39 am

    Benito Delicias said...

    sounds great….very very surprised with Hudson’s voice, and the video that came out is also very good for her…

  • 3 11-27-2009 at 10:43 am

    Loyal said...

    Fun song but still seems odd to me, lyrically and in the context of the film.

    How’s Guarda la Luna?

  • 4 11-27-2009 at 11:13 am

    A.J said...

    I’m fairly certain that in the standard form of Italian it should be “cinema italiana” but I think italiano is accepted

  • 5 11-27-2009 at 11:43 am

    Michael said...

    I do think this song is set up well musically in the film (it comes out of a scene in which a famous Italian song with a similar rhythm, “Quando, Quando, Quando” is heard playing in the background).

    There is certainly no denying that this song is incredibly catchy and that Hudson performs it well. It would of course be great fun to see her do it live on the ceremony.

    “Guarda la Luna” features the music from the “Waltz From Nine” from the original stage production – they’ve simply written lyrics to go with it. It’s actually one of the few musical moments of the film to me that didn’t seem completely necessary – but I’m sure they weren’t about to cut Sophia Loren’s already small part any further.

  • 6 11-27-2009 at 1:07 pm

    tintin said...

    I love it! jajaja

  • 7 11-27-2009 at 1:23 pm

    Patryk said...

    I am pleasantly surprised. Now just substitute “Alex Alex” in place of “Guido Guido.”

  • 8 11-27-2009 at 1:50 pm

    McAllister said...

    I wish the filmmakers had paid a little more attention to the Italian language (since they are trying so hard to “be italian”) and used the correct pronunciation of “cinema.” Ci = ‘Ch’ sound, not a soft ‘C’.

  • 9 11-27-2009 at 2:26 pm

    cca said...

    A.J.: the lyrics are correct: In italian “Cinema” is a masculine noun (il cinema), so the right adjective is “Italiano”

  • 10 11-27-2009 at 3:26 pm

    richard said...

    Like Andrew R said, Kate’s character, Stephanie, wasn’t created for the film, but adapted from the character Stephanie Necrophorus, who had a brief but fun bit in Follies Bergere. That character was a film critic whose pen name was Robespierre, and who openly disliked Contini’s filmmaking.

    I’m not a fan of the new song Kate sings, although her singing is better than Nicole’s will probably be. I expect her to butcher Unusual Way. But I’d love to be wrong.

  • 11 11-27-2009 at 4:09 pm

    Kristopher Tapley said...

    Hudson said she was created for the film in a Q&A recently so I figured if anyone knew what was what on that, it would be her. I guess I was wrong (I’ve never seen the musical). So thanks for the correction.

  • 12 11-27-2009 at 6:15 pm

    Georgie said...

    I agree that it’s catchy and does feel out of place… I just wish Penelope or Nicole had received a new song instead of Kate, even though she does fine with the song. Not impressive but not horrible. Hopefully the preview making her look like one of the main attractions will widen the audience.

    And they lowered the key of Unusual Way but I still think Nicole sounds good.

  • 13 11-27-2009 at 6:37 pm

    Nine Fan said...

    Stephanie is in the stage show but it’s a totally different role. She hates Guido’s movies in the stage show but she loves his movies in the film.

  • 14 11-27-2009 at 8:23 pm

    Matt King said...

    Shockingly, Kate doesn’t suck. The song, however, leaves much to be desired. It’s terrible. Just awful. Crap song.

  • 15 11-27-2009 at 8:35 pm

    Mr. Milich said...

    Listening to that all I could think of was George Hamilton and Susan Saint James disco dancing…

  • 16 11-27-2009 at 8:58 pm

    Michael said...

    I actually think what has gotten blurred is that Rob Marshall created the expanded role of Stephanie for Kate Hudson after her audition. So while he didn’t invent the role, he did invent the character in terms of what she does in this movie (i.e her new perspective, song etc to fit Hudson).

    Going way back up to what McAllister says — Stephanie is an American journalist. For the first part of the song she pronounces the title as an American would. Notice if you listen all the way through that at the end, during the Italian lyrics, she does indeed pronounce it “Chin-ema Italiano.”

  • 17 11-27-2009 at 10:59 pm

    Alex said...

    Richard:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xS9nk7bpb4Q

    I don’t think she butchers it at all.

  • 18 11-28-2009 at 10:49 am

    McAllister said...

    Michael – Thanks for pointing that out… I didn’t get to the very end of the song. Woops.

  • 19 11-28-2009 at 11:35 am

    georgieS said...

    The song isn’t out of place at all if you have read what Maury Yeston and Rob Marshall say about the role of Stephanie, as well as what screeners have said. It is a turning point in the story for Guido, and the song helps to educate modern-day audiences about Italian cinema at the time. Maury Yeston makes a preemptive strike at groupies of the stage presentation, knowing that there will be some who don’t want to see any changes to that production. That would be silly and boring, he says. I agree.

  • 20 11-28-2009 at 11:42 am

    georgieS said...

    Kate Hudson has had voice lessons over the years, and it shows. While certainly her voice is not on the level of Sarah Ferguson, it is much, much better than Cotillard’s. I love Marion and she is supposed to be brilliant in this film. However, I fear for her if her song gets a nod and she winds up singing at the Oscars. Her voice is very pretty, but it is the kind of voice that will no hold up in a live performance. I hope she is taking lessons just in case, which should help. She needs to be practicing holding notes on a daily basis.

  • 21 11-28-2009 at 7:04 pm

    Alex said...

    Or she can just get Kristen Chenoweth to sing it for her.

    I think Amy Adams gave her the more vocally demanding song in Enchanted because she knew she couldn’t sing it well live from start to finish in front of that many people..

  • 22 11-29-2009 at 4:58 am

    Guy Lodge said...

    Similarly, Renee Zellweger bowed out of singing at the ceremony when “I Move On” was nominated. Queen Latifah sang her part instead. The original artist isn’t obliged to sing at the Oscars.

  • 23 12-18-2009 at 8:05 am

    jasmine said...

    i love her voice.. i never thought she can sing that good.. LOVE HER!!

  • 24 12-29-2009 at 11:48 am

    Amelia said...

    Everyone in the Nine movie sang well…not a slacker among them. Cinema Italiano was not at all out of place. It represented the American fascination with all things Italian that was going on in the 60s.