11/3 Oscarweb Round-up

Posted by · 9:07 am · November 3rd, 2009

Roger CormanDocumentary filmmaker whose work inspired the book “The Men Who Stare at Goats” seeks brutal vengeance for being “airbrushed” out of the film. [The Independent]

Jeff Wells sings the praises of “A Single Man” actor Nicholas Hoult. [Hollywood Elsewhere]

David Poland talks to honorary Oscar recipient Roger Corman. [Movie City News]

Pete Hammond reports on a big AFI Fest splash in the form of “Precious.” [Notes on a Season]

Steven Zeitchick takes note of this year’s dearth of original screenplay contenders. [Hollywood Reporter]

Anne Thompson on the revealing contrast between the London and AFI film fests. [Thompson on Hollywood]

Ben Wishaw talks “Bright Star” across the pond. [Daily Telegraph]

As the local paper further steps up its crafts coverage (ahem), Susan King writes up the production design of “Nine.” [Los Angeles Times]

David Cox slams “An Education,” misses the point of education as youth. [The Guardian]




→ 8 Comments Tags: , , , , , , , , , , | Filed in: Daily

8 responses so far

  • 1 11-03-2009 at 9:27 am

    adelutza said...

    I don’t know if David Cox went to Univeristy or not but, boy, the grapes are sour! You’d think that someone who’s writing for a living would be more kenn to “read English” at Oxford.

  • 2 11-03-2009 at 9:28 am

    Chase K. said...

    The David Cox piece is interesting, but it doesn’t alter my love for “An Education” and is mostly misjudged.

    The point of the film was to paint of picture of what it was like for young women growing up in a 196’s society that gave them very little in the way of options.

    ***SPOILER***

    Jenny goes back to school at the end because that’s all she has left — it’s her last resort. The film isn’t telling us that we have to go get a degree or we’re doomed. For her, at that moment, yes — but you can’t look at a film like “An Education” with a 21st century viewpoint.

  • 3 11-03-2009 at 10:37 am

    AmericanRequiem said...

    im so sick of the argument there are no good original screenplays when there are so many

    bright star
    up
    district 9
    inglorious basterds
    the hurt locker
    a serious man
    the white ribbon
    500 days of summer
    and thats only hat weve seen so far as Im sure Avatar could be big here, its one of the stronger categories this year id say

  • 4 11-03-2009 at 10:50 am

    Rob said...

    ***SPOILER***

    Jenny goes back to school at the end because that’s all she has left — it’s her last resort. The film isn’t telling us that we have to go get a degree or we’re doomed. For her, at that moment, yes — but you can’t look at a film like “An Education” with a 21st century viewpoint.

    Sure, except that the movie is clearly depicting that as an all-is-revolved, “happy” ending. The context you describe isn’t there at all.

  • 5 11-03-2009 at 10:56 am

    Kristopher Tapley said...

    Eight isn’t a lot, Req.

  • 6 11-03-2009 at 11:44 am

    qwiggles said...

    I’m not especially fond of the film, but Cox’s piece is a misreading — he’s reduced what comes off as a mixed message (problematically mixed, I think) in the film to a clear argument about how Oxford is the way to go.

    (major spoilers)

    I think the film flirts dangerously close with this kind of thinking at the end, with Olivia Williams’s character’s clunky response — “That’s exactly what I’d hoped you’d say!” — to Jenny’s request for help and the ensuing montage of Jenny studying very, very hard, with heavy, heavy books, and finally getting her letter, yes!

    But more problematic for me is how it argues more consistently for the other kind of education. For all Jenny’s talk of the thrills of busting out of restrictive gender roles and taking in art, literature, philosophy, and life with David and friends, we see her buying books and attending auctions to a much greater extent than we see her reading or defending her love for that painting she so admires. I’m not convinced, then, that Jenny learns all that much, apart from 1) auctions are cool and 2) adults will let you down. Contrary to Cox, I don’t think the film is presenting this life as vapid compared to a life of proper schooling: it seems instead to be holding it up as a more authentic education, and I’m not sure I ever bought it.

  • 7 11-03-2009 at 12:48 pm

    Chase K. said...

    “Sure, except that the movie is clearly depicting that as an all-is-revolved, “happy” ending. The context you describe isn’t there at all.”

    It’s definitely a little to tied-up at the end, and I didn’t really buy/like the whole “getting back into Oxford” bit — plus the “as if I’d never been [to Paris]” line. It does feel artificially happy in its conclusion.

    But, the whole character of Jenny is someone whose individuality would have thrived ten years later — in this film, in 1961, she has to resign herself to a life of comformity. I think “An Education” hammers that point home for 95 minutes and then glosses it up in the final 5, I’ll agree with that point.

  • 8 11-03-2009 at 9:39 pm

    SHAAAARK said...

    Steven Zeitchik is a moron for not mentioning Bright Star and The Hurt Locker in his story about Original Screenplay.