Live your life

Posted by · 12:29 pm · June 7th, 2009

Rubina AliMake no mistake, I found 9 year-old Rubina Ali as adorable in “Slumdog Millionaire” as everyone else did. I also found her a rather more expressive actress than her elder incarnation, Freida Pinto. And I was as sad as anyone to hear of her home, along with those of many others, being bulldozed by the Indian government.

But with all that said, I can’t summon much enthusiasm for the idea of her impending autobiography, even if it is for charity:

Rubina Ali, one of the child stars of the Oscar-winning film Slumdog Millionaire, is to publish her life story.

Madeline Toy at Transworld Publishers said on Friday that “Slumgirl Dreaming: My Journey to the Stars” will be published in Britain in mid-July. She said both Transworld Publishers and Random House Children’s Books will publish the book at the same time. Both companies are units of Random House Group Ltd. Toy said all royalties will go to Rubina and Médecins du Monde, a French medical aid organisation.

I tend to be of the mind that people should have a bit more life under their belt before they commit it to paper. (Or rather, have some anonymous hack do so for them.) I get irked when 20-somethings publish their life stories (as is de rigeur for British celebs, be they footballers or former “Big Brother” contestants), but this is a whole new level of bizarre.

Can the film adaptation be far away? Can the Academy resist the appeal of “Slumdog” redux, now with added biopic power? How meta would that be?




→ 5 Comments Tags: , | Filed in: Daily

5 responses so far

  • 1 6-07-2009 at 3:34 pm

    Silencio said...

    Redux, of this? Horrifying.

    In response to your comment about living long enough to warrant an autobiography, I imagine a difference in the way the same childhood would be written. The 20-year-old’s memories would probably be more vivid than the same author at 40. While there is risk of an immature perspective from the younger author, there is also the risk of lingering bitterness or what have you that unfairly colors the same childhood recollection. Also, those who are older tend to assume that they’ve acquired certain levels of wisdom that they may or may not actually possess, which can negate the fascinating kind of questioning that can really make personal stories worth a read. I’d actually be curious about this kid’s take on things, as long as her handlers didn’t take reins of her voice and story. My years of experience with kids has reminded me repeatedly how raw their eyes can be.

  • 2 6-07-2009 at 4:09 pm

    Guy Lodge said...

    “The 20-year-old’s memories would probably be more vivid than the same author at 40. While there is risk of an immature perspective from the younger author, there is also the risk of lingering bitterness or what have you that unfairly colors the same childhood recollection.”

    I refer you to Dirk Bogarde’s childhood memoirs as but one example to counter that argument.

  • 3 6-07-2009 at 4:43 pm

    Silencio said...

    I should clarify that my argument can be easily supported AND refuted with the right examples, but is worth considering. It’s really a case by case thing.

  • 4 6-07-2009 at 10:54 pm

    Bisovi said...

    Truly remarkable, children 9 years old did not make a mistakes. With this capability, the state must be more attention to her. State and nation should be proud. This child can become a great artist in the future

  • 5 6-08-2009 at 1:18 pm

    Ryan said...

    It all depends on the experiences experienced by the autobiographer.

    I mean I’d read Anne Frank’s autobiography over a Tori Spelling or Paris Hilton. It’s all in the context and what the autobiography is really saying.